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Work Stress and Being Overworked

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  • Work Stress and Being Overworked

    I’m a 17 year old casual employee at my job and i’m working 40+ hours a week, at first i found it nice because i was getting money and that’s what mattered to me at that point but now everything is getting a little too crazy. I get called in for shifts on the day they want me there and i can’t help but say yes because i feel bad and i come in and do it, i get pushed hard by my managers yelling and telling me that i need to do things better ect and now i’ve fallen sick. I’ve called in multiple times saying i can’t come in because i’m sick and they’ve understood for the most part but now they’re saying that they need me to come back so i went back to work and a couple of hours into my shift i fainted while working and have ended up in worse condition, i’m being overworked to the point where i am fainting and getting sick because of my work life and i can’t handle it but i need the job to be able to pay for my university fees and my car ect

  • #2
    Sounds like you need to be setting boundaries at your work. It's great to want to be helpful, but they also need to respect that you need time off and that if you're sick you simply can't come in. Your health isn't worth a job. It's ok to be firm but kind with them. If there are times you don't want to come in you can tell them you are sick and can't do it and that is it. If you do want to go in to earn extra money that's fine too, but don't feel like you have to work that extra time. Set your boundaries and be firm. Call or text us anytime at 888-222-2228.

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    • #3
      You have to take care of yourself before you take care of others. Everyone needs and deserves some personal time off from work to take care of themselves. You don't deserve to be bullied or guilted into working - set your limits!

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      • #4
        I'm sorry to hear about the pressure you've been under. One of the most important lessons I had to learn during my experience working was how to say no. It took me a while to realize and a director of mine had to pull me aside to point it out, but she explained to me that by always saying yes you bog yourself down and decrease your work efficacy to the point where sometimes it no longer benefits either party (yourself or those who are asking for your help when you're short on time, resources or energy). Unfortunately your managers don't yet realize this, but by learning to put your own health first, you ultimately help your company by being able to be a staff member who can perform the job and exceed expectations. If you're able, try to have a sit down with your managers to let them know how you are feeling as they may not be aware they are behaving in the manner you've described.

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        • #5
          Thank you so much for sharing your experience in this space. I can related to you as I am someone who perviously did not know how to say "no" or stand up to myself when it would come to superiors like managers at work. Because I found myself in situations that I did not want to be in, I eventually took the time to learn to say no and to make sure my voice was heard. At the end of the day, you are your greatest advocate and you owe it to yourself to make sure you are being treated in way that makes you comfortable. In this specific situation, it sounds like a meeting with you managers may be necessary to set some boundaries. A great way to prepare for a difficult conversation is to make sure you know what you want. If you want to work less hours and maybe go part time for a couple months or completely change to part time, then make that your goal of the conversation. Your health and happiness comes first. Also from how the situation seems, these managers really need you more than you need them so do not forget your value.

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          • #6
            I am so sorry to hear about how overworked you are, especially at such a young age! I think that it is easy to fall into a "yes-pattern" to please your bosses. It would be helpful to set boundaries with yourself first, and then your employers. You should only allow yourself to work your contracted hours and let your employers know this as well. If you are feeling up to it, then only YOU should be able to decide if you are willing and able to pick up extra shifts. Yes this is a means to afford your life, but it should not be your life. Hope this helps!

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